Mosquitoes of Florida

There are currently 80 species of mosquitoes known to occur or have been identified from various collections in Florida, more than any other state. Of these, 33 species can cause pest problems for man and/or domestic animals in all or parts of the state. Thirteen species are capable of transmitting pathogens that cause disease in humans and animals. They all vary to some extent in their individual preferences for types of blood meals, egg laying sites, time of day they will fly, temperature at which they are most active, and seasonality. Our lab at the Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory has developed an electronic database of Florida mosquitoes and general information about their distribution, medical importance, and habitats.

Expanded Distribution Maps for Florida Mosquito Species - Unpublished

Culex coronator

 

FMEL Florida Mosquito Database

Our lab at the Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory has developed an electronic database of Florida mosquitoes and general information about their distribution, medical importance, and habitats.

 

 

Common Mosquitoes of Florida Insect ID Deck

Aquatic habitats abound in our state, making it home to dozens of mosquito pest species. This ID deck is designed to help Floridians identify 33 different mosquitoes they may encounter in the wilds or in their own backyard. Each species is clearly described. Information such as habitat, medical importance and state locator maps appear along with each enlarged, full-color photo of an adult mosquito. The laminated cards are pocket-sized at 3" x 4" and are bound with two removable, metal rings.
 

 

Identification and Geographical Distribution of the Mosquitoes of North America, North of Mexico by Richard F. Darsie Jr. and Ronald A. Ward

"A must-have for anyone involved with mosquitoes. This is the only key that incorporates the recent changes in nomenclature and new species listings with their respective distribution."--Dennis Moore, director, Pasco County Mosquito Control District.

 

 

Revised Edition of Keys to the Adult Females and Fourth Instar Larvae of the Mosquitoes of Florida by Richard Darsie and Charlie Morris.