Jonathan Day

Professor, University of Florida

Doctor of Philosophy; University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Medical Entomology Major

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About

Jonathan Day is Professor of Medical Entomology at the University of Florida where he studies the natural history, epidemiology, and ecology of mosquito-borne viruses found in Florida and North America. These include St. Louis encephalitis, eastern equine encephalitis, and West Nile viruses. Field and laboratory studies undertaken in his laboratory include tracking arboviral transmission by using novel surveillance techniques, tracking known and suspected vector populations, tracking avian amplification host populations, predicting epidemic and enzootic transmission, and creating human and domestic animal transmission risk maps for Florida. These risk maps are updated periodically during the transmission season and can be viewed on the Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory Encephalitis Information System (EIS).

Dr. Day also studies novel biting fly control strategies including removal trapping protocols directed against mosquitoes and biting midges. Presently, a large scale field test is underway on an isolated island in the Bahamas to evaluate the ability of an attractant-based removal trapping protocol to control biting midges and mosquitoes on the island.

Research Interests

Mosquito-borne diseases including malaria, yellow fever, dengue, St. Louis encephalitis and eastern equine encephalitis have historically had a serious adverse impact on the state of Florida. Epidemics caused by these diseases can result in severe hardship to Florida residents and visitors. Epidemics have also created formidable economic recessions in a state which relies on tourism as its economic base. Recently, West Nile virus has positioned itself to generate hardships equal to those reported for yellow fever and malaria at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries. Since 1985, the main focus of research by my laboratory group has been arboviral surveillance and the prediction of mosquito-borne disease epidemics in Florida. These research programs have relied heavily on collaborations with groups inside and outside of Florida. Understanding the dynamics of arboviral transmission involves field and laboratory research that focuses on the abundance and age structure of mosquito vector populations, the abundance and age structure of avian amplification host populations, the movement and transmission of viruses, and environmental factors such as temperature and rainfall that drive these diverse biological cycles.

I have always had a keen interest in natural history and ecology. My gravitation toward medical entomology actually occurred when I chose my Ph.D. program. After completing a Masters degree in Ecology, I was presented with the options of studying sandpiper ecology at the University of North Dakota, hummingbird physiology at Syracuse University or medical entomology at the University of Massachusetts. At the time, my best guess was that future job opportunities would be greatest in the field of medical entomology. In addition, my future mentor, John Edman, made me an offer I couldn't refuse. My years at the University of Massachusetts were extremely stimulating and productive and, upon completion of my degree, I was able to follow Dr. Edman's path back to the Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory (FMEL) in Vero Beach where he had spent the first part of his professional career during the 1960s and early 1970s. In fact, during much of my career at the FMEL, I have been assigned Edman's former office and laboratory space. I arrived at the FMEL as a postdoctoral fellow in 1982 and was offered a faculty position (again, an offer I couldn't refuse) in 1986. I have been at the University of Florida's, Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory ever since.

The location of the FMEL within the ecological zone that separates temperate Florida to the north from subtropical Florida to the south places researchers in a perfect position to study vector-borne disease transmission. The rich history of vector-borne disease transmission in Florida is a large part of the reason that the FMEL exists. The physical position of the FMEL allows a wide variety of field-oriented research projects that address disease transmission questions from a field-research perspective. The establishment of a series of vector surveillance protocols was the first issue tackled by researchers in my laboratory group. Over the years, many individuals have contributed to the surveillance questions addressed by research projects funded through state and federal agencies. Without the collaborations of these individuals, forward progress in surveillance and epidemic prediction would not have been possible. The surveillance protocols developed at the FMEL were first tested during the summer and autumn of 1990 when a large St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) epidemic struck south Florida. All of the surveillance techniques in place during the winter and spring of 1990 indicated that the state was at risk for a major vector-borne disease epidemic. The first press conference to this effect was held 8 weeks before the peak of SLE transmission to Florida residents and visitors. This epidemic, a field experiment on a scale that could never be replicated in the laboratory or even approved as an experiment, solidified many of the surveillance protocols developed at the FMEL as standards for future vector surveillance programs. Since 1990 we have continued to modify and refine arboviral surveillance protocols in an attempt to fine-tune our epidemic forecasts. With the introduction of West Nile (WN) virus into Florida in 2001, these surveillance protocols have become even more imperative. The WN virus has the potential of causing massive human epidemics on a scale previously not seen. Indeed, such epidemics have already been realized in Illinois (2002), Colorado (2003), and Arizona (2004). To date, Florida has been spared, but in all likelihood, a major WN virus epidemic is in our future making accurate surveillance and epidemic predication even more critical to the residents and visitors of Florida.

Curriculum Vitae

Education

B.S. 1974. Lyndon State College, Lyndonville, Vermont. Major: Environmental Science.

M.S. 1978. State University of New York at Fredonia. MAJOR: Biology with an emphasis in Ecology. THESIS: The Population Dynamics and Possible Coevolution of Siphonapteran Nest Parasites Infesting the Southern Flying Squirrel (Glaucomys volans volans). GRADUATE ADVISOR: Allen H. Benton.

Ph.D. 1981. University of Massachusetts at Amherst. MAJOR: Medical Entomology. DISSERTATION: The Effect of Host Health on Mosquito Engorgement and its Possible Importance in Disease Transmission. GRADUATE ADVISOR: John D. Edman.

Employment

1986-Present. Assistant to Full Professor (1998), Department of Entomology and Nematology, Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory, IFAS, University of Florida, Vero Beach.

1982-1986. Postdoctoral Research Assistant, Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory, University of Florida, Vero Beach, FL.

1981-1982. Postdoctoral Research Assistant, Departments of Entomology and Zoology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA.

1978-1981. Graduate Research Assistant, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA.

1976-1978. Teaching Assistant, State University of New York at Fredonia. Courses taught: biology laboratory, human physiology laboratory, ecology laboratory, biology lecture.

Recent Appointments and Professional Service

2004. National Science Foundation/AAAS Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge Award.

2004-2007. University of Florida Research Foundation Professor.

2003. University of Florida/NSF Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate Award.

2003. Pelican Island Audubon Society Board Member of the Year.

2001-2005. Member of the Florida West Nile Partners Task Force.

2002. Peer Review Team for CDC, Ft. Collins, Colorado.

2001-2005. Subject Editor, Journal of Medical Entomology.

2001. USDA Secretary's Honor Award.

2000-2005. Environmental Protection Agency Scientific Advisory Panel on Insect Repellent Product Performance Testing Guideline Evaluation.

2000. Co-Chair, National Institutes of Health Select Panel on Vector Biology Research Priorities.

1999-2001. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention West Nile Virus Planning Panel.

1998-2005. Editorial Board, Journal of the Florida Mosquito Control Association.

1997-2000. Editorial Board, Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association, Chair 2000.

1995-2000. Editorial Board, Journal of Medical Entomology, Chair 2000.

1995-2000. Board of Directors and Southeastern Regional Director, Society for Vector Ecology.

1994-2003. Board of Directors, Pelican Island Audubon Society.

Patents

U.S. Patent 5,943,815 awarded 8-31-99. Paganessi, J., R. Lee and J.F. Day. Method and delivery system for the carbon dioxide-based area-specific attraction of insects, Part One.

U.S. Patent 6,272,790 awarded 8-14-01. Paganessi, J., R. Lee and J.F. Day. Method and delivery system for the carbon dioxide-based area-specific attraction of insects, Part Two

Creative Works

2001-2005: Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory Encephalitis Information System Florida Risk Maps (EIS).

Publications

Day, J.F., J.D. Edman and T.W. Scott. 1994. Reproductive fitness and survivorship of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) maintained on blood, with field observations from Thailand. J. Med. Entomol. 31:611-617.

Day, J.F. and R.D. Sjogren. 1994. Vector control by removal trapping. Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. 50:(6) Suppl.:126-133.

Day, J.F. and G.A. Curtis. 1994. When it rains, they soar--and that makes Culex nigripalpus a dangerous mosquito. American Entomologist 40:162-167.

Linley, J.R., A.H. Benton and J.F. Day. 1994. Ultrastructure of the eggs of seven flea species (Siphonaptera). J. Med. Entomol. 31:813-827.

Day, J.F., E.E. Storrs, L.M. Stark, A.L. Lewis and S. Williams. 1995. Antibodies to St. Louis encephalitis virus in armadillos from southern Florida. Journal of Wildlife Diseases 31:10-14.

Bidlingmayer, W.L., J.F. Day and D.G. Evans. 1995. Effect of wind velocity on suction trap catches of some Florida mosquitoes. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 11:295-301.

Day, J.F. and L.M. Stark. 1996. Transmission patterns of St. Louis encephalitis and eastern equine encephalitis viruses in Florida: 1978-1993. Journal of Medical Entomology 33:132-139.

Day, J.F., L.M. Stark, J.-t. Zhang, A.M. Ramsey and T.M. Scott. 1996. Antibodies to arthropod-borne encephalitis viruses in small mammals from southern Florida. Journal of Wildlife Diseases 32:431-436.

Day, J.F., D. Duzak, Y. Braverman, A. Chizov-Ginzburg smf J.R. Linley. 1997. Ultrastructure of the eggs of Culicoides circumscriptus, Culicoides gejelensis and Culicoides imicola (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 13:76-83.

Day, J.F. and G.A. Curtis. 1999. Culex nigripalpus (Diptera: Culicidae) blood feeding and oviposition before, during and after a widespread St. Louis encephalitis virus epidemic in Florida, USA. J. Med. Entomol. 36:176-181.

Day, J.F. and L.M. Stark. 1999. Avian serology in a St. Louis encephalitis epicenter before, during, and after a widespread epidemic in south Florida, USA. J. Med. Entomol. 36:614-624.

Day, J.F. and L.M. Stark. 2000. Frequency of St. Louis encephalitis in humans from Florida, USA: 1990-1999. J. Med. Entomol. 37:626-633.

Day, J.F., J.D. Edman, S.E. Kunz and S.K. Wikel. 2000. Direct injury caused by arthropods, Chapter 4. In B.F. Eldridge and J.D. Edman (eds.), A Text Book of Medical Entomology; Human and Animal Diseases Caused by Insects and Other Arthropods. Kluwer Academic Publishers, New York, 697pp.

Eldridge, B.F., T.W. Scott, J.F. Day and W.J. Tabachnick. 2000. Arbovirus diseases, Chapter 11. In B.F. Eldridge and J.D. Edman (eds.), A Text Book of Medical Entomology; Human and Animal Diseases Caused by Insects and Other Arthropods. Kluwer Academic Publishers, New York, 697pp.

Day, J.F. 2001. Predicting St. Louis encephalitis virus epidemics: Lessons from recent, and not so recent, outbreaks. Annual Review of Entomology 46:111-38.

Lord, C.C and J.F. Day. 2001. Simulation studies of St. Louis encephalitis in south Florida. Vector-borne and Zoonotic Diseases 1:299-315.

Lord, C.C and J.F. Day. 2001. Simulation studies of St. Louis encephalitis and West Nile viruses: the impact of bird mortality. Vector-borne and Zoonotic Diseases 1:317-329.

Shaman, J., J.F. Day and M. Stieglitz. 2002. Drought-induced amplification of St. Louis encephalitis virus in Florida. Emerging Infectious Diseases 8:575-580.

Fradin, M.S. and J.F. Day. 2002. Comparative protection times for 17 arthropod repellent formulations in low-density arm-in-cage laboratory tests. New England Journal of Medicine 347:13-18.

Darsie, R.F. and J.F. Day. 2003. Studies of the genus Culex Linnaeus in Florida I. Re-description of the pupae of Culex nigripalpus Theobald and Culex tarsalis Coquillett, vectors of St. Louis encephalitis and a key to pupae of Culex species in eastern United States. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington 105:100-107.

Rutledge, C. R., J. F. Day, C. C. Lord, L. M. Stark, and W. J. Tabachnick. 2003. West Nile virus infection rates in Culex nigripalpus (Diptera: Culicidae) do not reflect transmission rates in Florida. J. Med. Entomol. 40: 253-258.

Shaman, J., J.F. Day and M. Stieglitz. 2003. St. Louis encephalitis virus in wild birds during the 1990 south Florida epidemic: The importance of drought, wetting conditions, and the emergence of Culex nigripalpus (Diptera: Culicidae) to arboviral amplification and transmission. Journal of Medical Entomology 40:547-554.

Rutledge, C.R., J.F. Day, C.L. Lord, G.F. O'Meara, J.R. Rey and W.J. Tabachnick. 2003 (2004 publication date). Florida mosquito control response to the challenge of West Nile virus. Technical Bulletin of the Florida Mosquito Control Association 4:1-43.

Garvin, M.C., K.A. Travin, L.M. Stark, G. E. Woolfenden, J.W. Fitzpatrick and J.F. Day. 2004. Arboviral infection on two species of wild Jays (Aves: Corvidae): evidence for population impacts. Journal of Medical Entomology 41:215-225.

Shaman, J., J.F. Day, M. Stieglitz, S. Zebiak and M. Cane. 2004. Seasonal forecast of St. Louis encephalitis virus transmission, Florida. Emerging Infectious Diseases 10:802-809.

Shaman, J., J.F. Day and M. Stieglitz. 2004. The spatial-temporal distribution of drought, wetting, and human cases of St. Louis encephalitis in south-central Florida. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 71:251-261.

Darsie, R.F. and J.F. Day. 2004. Studies of the genus Culex in Florida II. Redescription of the fourth instar of Culex nigripalpus. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 20:110-114.

Spielman, A., T.G. Andreadis, C.S. Apperson, A.J. Cornel, J.F. Day, J.D. Edman, D. Fish, L.C. Harrington, A.E. Kiszewski, R. Lampman, G.C. Lanzaro, F.R. Matuschka, L.E. Munstermann, R.S. Nasci, D.E. Norris, R.J. Novak, R.J. Pollach, W.K. Reisen, P. Reiter, H.M. Savage, W.J. Tabachnick and D.M. Wesson. 2004. Outbreak of West Nile Virus in North America. Science 306:1473-1475.

Douglas, H.D., J.E. Co, T.H. Jones, W.E. Conner and J.F. Day. 2005. Chemical odorant of colonial seabird repels mosquitoes. Journal of Medical Entomology 42:647-651.

Darsie, R.F. and J.F. Day. 2005. Redescription of the pupa of Culex (Culex) declarator Dyar and Knab (Diptera, Culicidae), with amendments to the Culex pupae of the eastern United States. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 21:128-130.

Shaman, J., J.F. Day and M. Stieglitz. 2005. Drought-Induced amplification and epidemic transmission of West Nile Virus in south Florida. Journal of Medical Entomology 42:134-141.

Shaman, J. and J.F. Day. 2005. Achieving operational hydrologic monitoring of mosquito-borne disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases 11:1343-1350.

Day, J.F. 2005. Host-seeking strategies of mosquito disease vectors. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 21 (4 Supplement):17-22.

Rutledge-Connelly, C.R., J.F. Day and G.K. Ross. 2006. Enhancing mosquito-borne disease surveillance in Florida. Journal of Extension 44 (5):Article Number 5IAW4.

Shaman, J., J.F. Day, M. Stieglitz, S. Zebiak, and M. Cane. 2006. An ensemble seasonal forecast of human cases of St. Louis encephalitis in Florida based on seasonal hydrologic forecasts. Climatic Change 75:495-511.

Darsie, R.F., J.R. Almasi, and J.F. Day. 2006. Studies of the genus Culex Linnaeus in Florida III. Redescription of the fourth-stage larva of Culex salinarius Coquillett and comparison with that of Cx. nigripalpus Theobald. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 22:179-184.

Darsie, R.F. and J.F. Day. 2006. Redescription of the pupa of Culex salinarius Coquillett and comparison with Culex nigripalpus Theobald. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 22(3):547-549.

Harbison, J.E., E.M. Mathenge, G.O. Misiani, W.R. Mukabana, and J.F. Day. 2006. A simple method for sampling indoor-resting malaria mosquitoes Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles funestus (Diptera: Culicidae) in Africa. Journal of Medical Entomology 43:473-479.

Dusek, R.J., M.G. Spaulding, D.J. Forrester, N. Komar and J.F. Day. 2006. Morbidity and mortality factors in pre-fledged Florida Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis pratensis) chicks. Proceedings North American Crane Workshop 9:45-52.

Xue, R., A. Ali and J.F. Day. 2006. Commercially available insect repellents and criteria for their use, Chapter 25. In M. Debboun, S.P. Frances and D. Strickman (eds.), Insect Repellents: Principles, Methods, and Uses. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 495pp.

Vlach, J.J., K.J. Hall, J.F. Day, G.A. Curtis, L.J. Hribar and E.M. Fussell. 2006. Interisland dispersal of the black salt marsh mosquito, Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Florida Keys. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 22(4):615-621.

Shaman, J. and J.F. Day. 2007. Reproductive phase locking of mosquito populations in response to rainfall frequency. PloS ONE 2(3): e331. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0000331.

Darsie, R.F. and J.F. Day. 2007. Redescription of the pupa of Culex restuans and a comparison with Culex nigripalpus. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 23(2):95-98.

Day, J.F. and J. Shaman. 2008. Using hydrologic conditions to track the risk of focal and epidemic arboviral transmission in peninsular Florida. Journal of Medical Entomology 45(3):458-469.

Vitek, C.J., S.L. Richards, C.N. Mores, J.F. Day and C.C. Lord. 2008. Arbovirus transmission by Culex nigripalpus Theobald in Florida, 2005. Journal of Medical Entomology 45(3):483-493.

Day, J.F. 2008. In My Opinion: Chikungunya virus in Florida: Lessons from Italy, 2007. Florida Journal of Environmental Health 199 (Summer 2008):11-14.

Day, J.F. 2008. A brief history of dengue virus in Florida. Florida Journal of Environmental Health 201 (Winter 2008):7-10.

Connelly, R., J.F. Day and C. Lord. 2008. Competition as a teaching tool. Wing Beats 19 (4):4-9.

Day, J. F. 2009. Disease surveillance, outbreaks, and control in Florida, Chapter 8. In, C.R. Connelly and D.B. Carlson (Eds.), Florida Mosquito Control: The state of the mission as defined by mosquito controllers, regulators, and environmental managers, Florida Coordinating Council on Mosquito Control, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory, Vero Beach, Florida, 259pp.

Day, J.F. and J. Shaman. 2009. Severe winter freezes enhance St. Louis encephalitis virus amplification and epidemic transmission in peninsular Florida. Journal of Medical Entomology 46(6):1498-1506.

Rios, L.M.V., J-J Sheu, J.F. Day, J.E. Maruniak, H. Zaretsky and M.T. Long. 2009. Extrinsic risk factors associated with West Nile virus infection in Florida Horses. Medical and Veterinary Entomology 23(4):357-366.

McCann, S., J.F. Day, S. Allan and C. Lord. 2009. Age modifies effect of body size on fecundity in Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae). Journal of Vector Ecology 34(2):174-181.

Shaman, J., J.F. Day and N. Komar. 2010. Hydrologic conditions describe West Nile virus risk in Colorado. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 7:494-508; doi:10.3390/ijerph7020494.

Day, J.F. 2010. A brief history of St. Louis encephalitis virus in Florida. Florida Journal of Environmental Health 205 (Spring 2010):21-25.

Day, J.F. 2010. “Surveillance, prevention and control of vector-borne infections” In Edman, J. (ed.), Vector- Borne Diseases: The Biomedical & Life Sciences Collection, Henry Stewart Talks Ltd, London (online at http://hstalks.com?t=BL1182831-Day).

Tabachnick, W.J., W. R. Harvey, J. J. Becnel, G. G. Clark, R. Connelly, J. F. Day, P. J. Linser and K. J. Linthicum. 2011. Countering a bioterrorist introduction of pathogen-infected mosquitoes through mosquito control. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 27(2):175-177.

Day, J.F. and J. Shaman. 2011. Mosquito-borne arboviral surveillance and the prediction of disease outbreaks, Chapter 6. In Daneil Ruzek (editor), Flavivirus Encephalitis. InTech-Open Access Publisher, 478pp., ISBN 978-953-307-344-6.

Qualls, W.A., J.F. Day, R. Xue and B.F. Bowers. 2011. Altered response to DEET repellent after infection of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) with Sindbis virus. Journal of Medical Entomology 48 (6): 1226-1230.

Qualls, W.A., J.F. Day, R. Xue and B.F. Bowers. 2012. Sindbis virus infection alters blood feeding responses and DEET repellency in Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). Journal of Medical Entomology 49(2): 418- 423.

Qualls, W.A., J.F. Day, R. Xue, and B.F. Bowers. 2012. Altered behavioral responses of Sindbis virus-infected Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) to DEET and non-DEET based insect repellents. Acta Tropica 122:284- 290, doi: 10.1016/j.actatropica.2012.01.012.

Day, J.F., G.K. Ross and C.R. Connelly. 2013. The biology of arboviral transmission in Florida. Technical Bulletin of the Florida Mosquito Control Association 9:3-12.

Tabachnick, W.J. and J.F. Day. 2014. The impact of climate change on vector-borne arboviral episystems, Chapter 2. In Sunit Singh (editor), Viral Infections and Climate Change. John Wiley &Sons/Wiley Blackwell Press. Pages 21-34. ISBN 978-953-307-344-6.

Lord, C.C., B.W. Alto, S.L. Anderson, C.R. Connelly, J.F. Day, S.L. Richards, C.T. Smartt and W.J. Tabachnick. 2014. Can Horton hear the Whos? The importance of scale in mosquito-borne disease. Journal of Medical Entomology 51(2): 297-313.

Day, J.F. 2014. A history of the FMCA Dodd Short Courses. Wing Beats 24(4):25-31.

Day, J.F. 2014. Obituary, Richard Floyd Darsie, Jr., 1915-2014. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 30(2):147-151.

Day, J.F. 2014. The natural history of eastern equine encephalitis virus in Florida. One Health Newsletter 7(2): 1-4.

Xue, R.D., G.C. Muller and J.F. Day. 2014. Commercially available insect repellents and criteria for their use, Chapter 19, pp: 337-348. In M. Debboun, S.P. Frances and D. Strickman (eds.), Insect Repellents: Principles, Methods, and Uses, 2nd edition. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.

Day, J.F. 2014. “Surveillance, prevention and control of vector-borne infections, Second Edition” In Edman, J. (ed.), Vector-Borne Diseases: The Biomedical & Life Sciences Collection, Henry Stewart Talks Ltd, London (online at http://hstalks.com?t=BL1182831-Day).

Richards, S.L., C.R. Connelly, J.F. Day, T. Hope and R. Ortiz. 2015. Arthropods associated with carrion in a salt marsh habitat in southeastern Florida. Florida Entomologist 98(2):613-619.

Day, J.F., W.J. Tabachnick and C.T. Smartt. 2015. Factors that influence the transmission of West Nile virus in Florida. Journal of Medical Entomology 52(5):743-754; DOI:10.1093/jme/tjv076.

Day, J.F. 2015. AMCA Memorial Lecture Honoree: Dr. Richard Floyd Darsie, Jr. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 31(4):392-400.

 

Honors

1978. Sigma Xi.

1980. Awarded the Daniel M. Jobbins Scholarship. Presented by the Northeast Mosquito Control Association.

1981-1984. National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Trainee.

1990. Served on the Grant Review Board for the Louisiana Board of Regents.

1990. Awarded the Florida Mosquito Control Association Short Courses Outstanding Contributor and Teacher.

1992. Awarded the Florida Entomological Society Achievement for Outstanding Research.

1997. Invited presenter of the Highlights in Medical Entomology Lecture at the Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America.

2001. USDA Secretary’s Honor Award.

1999-2002. Peer Review Team for CDC, Ft. Collins, Colorado.

2001-06. Member of the Florida West Nile Partners Task Force.

2003. Pelican Island Audubon Society Board Member of the Year.

2003. University of Florida/NSF Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate Award.

2004-2007. University of Florida Research Foundation Professorship.

2004. National Science Foundation/AAAS Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge Award.

2005. UF IFAS Gold IMAGE Award.

2005. Joseph Y. Porter Distinguished Achievement Award from the FMCA.